Idaho Falls Dental Group
(208) 525-8383
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Our office is now located at:
3830 South 25th East, Idaho Falls, ID 83404

Restorative

Restorative Dentistry

Idaho Falls Dental Group is a dental restorative dental office in Idaho Falls, who uses a combination of cosmetic and restorative procedures to provide a functional mouth and an attractive smile. Our office provides dental services to restore your smile. From dentures to tooth-colored fillings we will work with you to achieve the best possible results. Please click on the menu buttons for descriptions and animations that detail what we can do for you.

Types of Fillings

When a cavity needs filled there are four choices in the filling material:

The most common is a composite filling, this is a natural tooth colored filling and bonds to the tooth for extra strength. There are also gold and silver fillings. Silver fillings are inexpensive and strong while gold fillings may look nicer and provide a better fit. The final option is a porcelain filling, also called an inlay, which is the most durable of fillings and is also the color of your natural teeth.

There is now new technology that allows you to replace old silver and gold fillings with a more natural looking, composite filling. Composite fillings are bonded to the tooth and research has proven them to be about 90% as strong as healthy, natural tooth material.

Other Benefits:
- Beautiful in appearance
- Completed in a single visit
- No filling leaks
- Less chance of tooth cracking

Types of Crowns

There are three basic types of crowns:

  1. 1) Porcelain outer surface with a metal base crown.
  2. 2) Pure porcelain or composite crown.
  3. 3) All metal crown, which is usually gold.
They all differ in durability, strength, appearance and cost.
Gold Crown

The 'gold' standard. Dental gold is about 60% gold alloy which is meant to match the hardness of the enamel of opposing teeth so both wear about evenly, an important trait.Gold does not tarnish or corrode and has some bacterial inhibiting quality. Gold crowns are strong and will not break. However, gold crowns obviously are not considered esthetic; they are gold colored. So usually gold crowns are used for lower back molars because they don't show there.

Porcelain Fused To Metal Crown (PFM)

This is most common type of crown and has a proven track record. PFM crowns are fairly aesthetic and they look like real teeth. However, the margins or borders may appear dark because PFM crowns have a metal substructure with layers of porcelain fired over the substructure. Porcelain is very hard, much harder than natural enamel and may cause excessive wear of the enamel of opposing teeth. Porcelain may break with extreme biting forces.

Full Porcelain Crowns

These are very esthetic, bonded crowns. They are mostly used for front teeth because they are the most natural looking type of crown and are often used in 'cosmetic' dentistry. There are many types, but they all have a common feature - no metal. They can occasionally break, but dental technology has advanced far enough to make them quite strong.

A crown is sometimes termed a "cap" or "jacket." A crown will restore a large filling or a cracked tooth to its original size, shape and tooth color. A crown may be recommended after root canal therapy has been completed, as the tooth tends to become brittle and is more likely to fracture. A crown can strengthen and protect the remaining tooth structure and improves the appearance of your teeth. With the advances in technology we now have the ability to make ceramic crowns with no metal.

To place a crown, your dentist must reduce 1-2 mm of the tooth to make room for it. Your dentist will then use a piece of thread or cord or use a laser to push the gum down around the tooth, to take an impression of the tooth. The impressions are sent to the lab where the crown is made. During that time, you will have a temporary crown. These crowns are usually made of plastic and are made in your dentist's office on the day of your visit. They are not meant to last. If a temporary crown is left in the mouth, the cement eventually washes out, and the tooth can decay.

At a second visit, your dentist will remove the temporary crown and test the permanent one. Sometimes crowns need additional polishing, or glaze or some other adjustment before they are placed. Once the crown is ready, it's cemented to your tooth.

When teeth are missing, a bridge may be used to replace a single tooth as well as multiple teeth. A bridge consists of both a false tooth, called a pontic, and the anchors (abutment crowns) that support the pontic. The entire structure spans the space vacated by the missing tooth and the adjacent teeth.

Neighboring tooth structure is removed shaping them to receive an anchor crown. An impression is then taken and sent to a dental lab where they fabricate the bridge.

The structure part of the bridge is created with a strong metal alloy that can handle the anticipated stresses.

Tooth-like porcelain is then fused to the structure. Once the bridge is tested for a correct fit, the anchor crowns are cemented to the neighboring teeth.

Office Hours

  • Monday:
  • Tuesday:
  • Wednesday:
  • Thursday:
  • Friday:
  • Saturday:
  • 8:00am - 5:00pm
  • 8:00am - 5:00pm
  • 10:00am - 7:00pm
  • 10:00am - 7:00pm
  • 8:00am - 5:00pm
  • 8:00am - 2:00pm

Contact Info
Phone | (208) 525-8383
Fax | (208) 523-6419
E-mail |

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